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What I Read in June

Growing Down

I enjoyed this latest work from Michael Kelley, and would absolutely recommend adding it to your library when it comes to thinking about discipleship, as well as your own posture towards walking in the obedience of faith. I took some quality highlights away but at the same time it felt like The Curious Christian and Do More Better (which are both excellent) got together and had a baby; it had its own personality and new things to offer but it seemed quite obvious who the parents were. The central idea is that in order to become more Christlike, we need to become more childlike—that is, dependent. The book is thoughtful, engaging, easy-to-follow, and definitely unpacks a necessary change in thinking when it comes to what it looks like to grow in grace.

How to Ruin Your Life

David was called a man after God’s own heart, and he gave us wonderful, timeless Psalms like Psalm 23. But David wasn’t perfect and sometimes the lessons we learn from his life are those of what not to do. When it comes to his tragic downfall through the taking of Bathsheba, Geiger points to three lessons; three traits that David failed to handle correctly that led to his ruin, and could just as easily lead to mine too.

Read my full review.

The Warden and the Wolf King (Wingfeather Saga, Book 4)

The ending brought tears to my eyes. Here Andrew Peterson brings a wonderfully well-rounded conclusion to the great story of the Throne Warden, Song Maiden, and High King of the Shining Isle. In what could very likely be my current favourite fiction book to date, the rich, immersive world and the deep, engaging characters constantly filled my imagination while I made my way through the largest book of the saga. To be honest, while I love Peterson’s songs and lyrics, I love his books much more. Five stars.

The Pastor as Scholar & the Scholar as Pastor

Since well before I graduated from seminary, I’ve known that the path God put me on would lead me to be either a scholar or a pastor. But are these roles really to be thought of with this binary distinction? With over 30 years in their fields, Pastor Piper demonstrates that his head has never truly left the academy, and Professor Carson shows that his heart has never truly left the church.
This book is important, and personally very helpful as I think about where God is calling me and shape that should take.

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Published inWhat I Read in (2018)